Round the County Wrap, Glory and Wicked Wahine with the Wins

John Buchan’s Glory won the ORC Division of the Round the County Race, despite a smokin’ first to finish on day two by Steve Travis’ Smoke. The “newest” member of the big boat fleet made its first racing appearance as Steve Johnson’s Mist.

Crossfire’s Day 2 Track

Of course Mist is already known in the area as Braveheart and then Valkyrie. Crossfire definitely has her hands full with all these TP 52s flying around. Nigel Barron of Crossfire reports, “We hooked some kelp halfway down San Juan Island that didn’t help, and really had some issues keeping the boat going in the lumps.”

The PHRF podium was filled with Division “0” boats, led by Darrin Towe’s Melges 32 Wicked Wahine. Carl Buchan ended up 10 minutes back in Madrona and Shorett/Burzycki’s Farr 395 Ace finished third with a particularly strong first day.

It’s worth noting that two Moore 24s cracked the top 10 overall with Bruzer in fourth and Moore Uff Da in eighth. That design never ages.

All photos by Jan Anderson, and of course there are many more. Please support Jan.

Local regular Bob Brunius won his class with the J/120 Time Bandit, but it wasn’t without a bit of self-reflection. “After having a disastrous race last year because of two faulty tactical decisions I made, I was thinking toxic thoughts about my ability to do this racing thing anymore. This year was different. Each day this race I made a call based on local knowledge that separated us from the fleet significantly and paid hugely. Confidence restored.”

The mighty Santa Cruz 33 Muffin hit an unmarked spire northeast side of Patos and retired under her own power to Anacortes, with no threat of sinking. Skipper Garry Greth said about the incident, “It is faster go in there for current relief and pressure in a southerly, but you can’t go in that far!” Note we’re hoping to do a full on piece on Muffin‘s remarkable renovation over the last few years here on sailish.com.

And finally, the results of the RTC Youth Sailing Challenge are in with Wild Rumpus earning $2131 for youth sailing, followed by Crazy Salsa with $1872 and Time Bandit with $1335.

Kurt grew up racing and cruising in the Midwest, and has raced Lasers since the late 1970s. He has been Assistant Editor at Sailing Magazine and a short stint as Editor of Northwest Yachting. Through Meadow Point Publishing he handles various marketing duties for smaller local companies. He currently is partners on a C&C 36 which he cruises throughout the Northwest. He’s married to the amazing Abby and is father to Ian and Gabe.

13 thoughts on “Round the County Wrap, Glory and Wicked Wahine with the Wins

  • November 15, 2017 at 11:01 am
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    More small boat results. Local super yacht results are interesting, but not relatable. I want to see more < 30' news to increase participation.

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    • November 15, 2017 at 11:06 am
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      Really valid point. I was hoping to get more tales from the guts of the fleet, and would still love to run them. Vin, were you out there? Anything to add?

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      • November 15, 2017 at 11:29 am
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        Not yet, I’ve been watching for stories of smaller boats doing the race. The low freeboard on a J/24 and the distance has kept me away. Would like to though..

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        • November 15, 2017 at 11:41 am
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          I would share your hesitancy – it can get pretty lumpy out there. It’s worth noting that the Moore 24s did so well – as I noted in the piece. I wish I had more (or Moore) detail on their races to provide, but alas do not. If I get any insights I’ll certainly share.

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          • November 15, 2017 at 11:59 am
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            Yes, the Moore 24s are what made me think of it.. when I asked about small boats doing it, earlier in the year, the group of Moores was used an example.. as some have made TransPacific crossings.

  • November 15, 2017 at 12:42 pm
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    Yes, it’s tempting to wax poetic about big, pretty expensive boats. Did anyone notice the ’73 IOR one tonner out there rocking the BBQ, radar tower + solar panels and 30 year old dacron? For a period, I had a lovely time with one elbow casually hooked around a shroud while eating hot beef stew and admiring a Moore 24 off our starboard bow plane a little on the downwind run on day 2. This just before I went back to admiring my beef stew. We finished near to the top third in both class and fleet. We had cushions to sit on, a diesel heater, substantially Moore than a pot to piss in, and of course cold beer. I did enjoy watching the sporty boats, they are pretty. At times, I even enjoyed passing the sporty boats. But seriously, it would be nice to see a few more comfortable plain white sloops out there having a good time, RTC is a terrific event. BTW, props to the Cal 34!!

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    • November 15, 2017 at 1:46 pm
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      Hi Jarred,

      Was it Arrow? 1970s masthead one tonners with BBQ and 30 year old dacron – they definitely should have a place out there! I’d love to have more stories from the inner workings of the fleet. Those races are just as exciting as the gold platers’. Hit me with more details and I’ll post!

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  • November 15, 2017 at 4:02 pm
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    Speaking as someone from one of the big boats, I can tell you, all Kurt needs is content. Send him a paragraph and a picture, and if it’s got a mast, he’ll write about it, and in my case make me sound more intelligent…

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    • November 15, 2017 at 4:15 pm
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      Thanks, Nigel. Crossfire’s fun, but you KNOW my heart’s with the 1970s One Tonners. Now that was bow work.

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      • November 16, 2017 at 3:37 pm
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        Yes, work. I was bow on Arrow in the STYC Fall Regatta. We did it shorthanded: 4 people, normally takes six.,, run to the bow, jibe, run to the pit, grind, repeat. My arms nearly fell off.

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        • November 16, 2017 at 4:21 pm
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          I did bow on an old Hood One Tonner in the SORC. Big sails. Jibing really meant something.

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  • November 17, 2017 at 7:58 am
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    Fun to read this Kurt – someone has to tell the big boat story though! Guess you’ll just have to get that keel boat of yours out racing so you have some intel….:) –

    And, for your information – we had hot lunch from our BBQ and cold ones from the cooler while also planing downwind at times….

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    • November 17, 2017 at 10:48 am
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      Hi Ben, my hat’s off to you as the original “wear the bbq all the time” boat. When I start – casually – racing the boat the bbq will stay attached loud and proud. Not sure I can bring myself to cook on it while racing. For all of you reading this, Ben wrote up a very nice report on RTC: http://sailnorthwest.com/the-greatest-race-in-america/. On sailish we’re going to have yet another report from mid-fleet plus extras.

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